UND And Kennan Institute To Host Conversation On US-Russia Relations

UND, Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute host “A Kennan Conversation:  U.S.-Russia Relations and the Geopolitics of a Changing Arctic” Friday, March 31

The University of North Dakota Department of Political Science and Public Administration and the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute will host “A Kennan Conversation:  U.S.-Russia Relations and the Geopolitics of a Changing Arctic” Friday, March 31, 9:30-11 a.m. in Clifford Hall Room 210.  The event features observations from U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp and expert analysis by the Honorable Kenneth S. Yalowitz (Wilson Center Global Fellow and former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Belarus and Georgia) and Matthew Rojansky (Director of the Kennan Institute), commentary by Dr. Paul Sum (UND Chair and Professor of Political Science and Public Administration) as Discussant, and Introductions from UND President Mark Kennedy.  The event is free and open to the public. 

The event is part of the Kennan Conversation program of the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute. The Kennan Conversation program brings top experts on Russia and the region to cities across the United States, so that local audiences have the opportunity to listen to and engage with them and learn more about this increasingly important part of the world. The Kennan Institute is a division of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the nation’s “key non-partisan policy forum for tackling global issues through independent research and open dialogue.” The Institute’s mission is to build and sustain deep mutual understanding, cooperation, and exchange among intellectual and opinion leaders in the United States, Russia, and the surrounding states, in order to promote regional and global peace, prosperity, and security.

As part of the discussion, Rojansky and Yalowitz will draw on their experience and expertise to discuss and give context to the changing shape of U.S.-Russia relations and geopolitics in a rapidly changing and increasingly vital Arctic region.