UND Indian Studies faculty member Gregory Gagnon to talk about his latest book on Prairie Public Nov. 15

Gregory “Greg” Gagnon, a faculty member in the University of North Dakota Department

Greg Gagnon

Greg Gagnon

 of Indian Studies, will be interviewed about his latest book, Culture and Customs of the Sioux Indians, on Prairie Public Broadcasting’s “Hear It Now” Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 3 p.m.; the show will be rebroadcast at 7 p.m. that day. The show also is available online at http://www.prairiepublic.org/radio/hear-it-now/ and will be archived after airing.

Gagnon’s upcoming Prairie Public interview is the latest addition to a continuing series of appearances on radio and public television. Gagnon also is set to appear on “Steamboats on the Red,” a Prairie Public documentary will be re-aired Nov. 21 at 9:30 p.m.

Gagnon’s career at UND has focused on service to American Indian communities and to sharing accurate information about American Indians with the larger North Dakota public.  

“The most important contributions an Indian Studies faculty member can make to the mission of UND and Indian Studies are to serve Indian communities and to communicate accurate, research-based information to the general public,” said Gagnon—an enrolled member of the Bad River Band of  the Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin—who recently announced his retirement as of Dec. 31.

Gagnon is a consultant to several tribal colleges, sharing his research on college governance and his experience in accreditation. He has worked with Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Sisseton-Wahpeton Community College, White Earth Tribal and Community College, Leech Lake Community College, Oglala Lakota College, and Red Lake tribal college.  have used Dr. Gagnon’s assistance.

Gagnon is a well- known speaker throughout North Dakota, sponsored, in part, by the North Dakota Council on the Humanities speakers program and the North Dakota Historical Society.  The Minnesota Historical Society and the Minnesota Council on the Humanities have also contracted Gagnon for teacher training workshops.  

Gagnon’s “Everything You Ought To Know About Indians” series has been a feature of Time Out Week at UND for several years. He also does guest lectures in classes throughout the university community. Stereotypes about American Indians is an area of his research that has provided material for presentations. 

“There are many negative stereotypes about American Indians that persist,” Gagnon said. “It  should be the responsibility of Indian Studies faculty, in particular, to help dispel these stereotypes because they do so much damage to Indian communities and often warp the way Indians are treated by the general public and governments.”

In reflecting on his time at UND, Gagnon said, “Service is as rewarding and satisfying as any of the other duties of faculty members. Teaching is a major part of the job and research and writing provides a foundation, but public service is crucial to the mission of the Indian Studies department and the University.”  

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Useful links:

*UND Department of Indian Studies http://arts-sciences.und.edu/indian-studies/

*UND Indian Studies faculty & staff page http://arts-sciences.und.edu/indian-studies/faculty-staff.cfm

*Amazon page for Dr. Gregory Gagnon’s Culture and Customs of the Sioux Indians

http://www.amazon.com/Culture-Customs-Indians-Peoples-America/dp/0313384541

*Prairie Public Broadcasting “Hear It Now” upcoming shows page

http://www.prairiepublic.org/radio/hear-it-now/hear-it-now-upcoming-shows/

*Bad River Ojibwe (Chippewa) Reservation http://www.badriver-nsn.gov/

 

Contact:

Juan Miguel Pedraza, writer/editor

UND Office of University Relations

701-777-6571 office 701-740-1321 cell

juan.pedraza@email.und.edu

 

David L. Dodds

Media Relations/Writer & Editor

Office of University Relations

264 Centennial Drive Stop 7144

Grand Forks, ND 58202-7144

701.777.5529| 701.777.4616 fax

david.dodds@email.und.edu

UND.edu

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